Month: March 2015

Literary Citizenship Festival: Select Quotes from Jen Knox

“The more I write, the more I’m noticing patterns of connectivity, as though there is a larger landscape I hadn’t planned on.”

knox

Jen Knox (’07) is a regular contributor to Fiction Southeast and the author of Don’t Tease the Elephants, a fiction chapbook with Monkey Puzzle Press. Her work has been recognized with several awards and published in over sixty print and online journals. Knox visited Otterbein and read her work on Friday, January 30 in Riley Auditorium.

“Animals are a theme that has been appearing in my writing a lot. We writers, we go through phases.”

“Writing from different perspectives, it’s fun–it’s like playing!”

“Otterbein taught me how to connect–that carries over.”

“If you’re called to do it, you really have no choice, because you’ll be miserable if you’re not doing it.”

“The more I write, the more I’m noticing patterns of connectivity, as though there is a larger landscape I hadn’t planned on.”

“Read the [literary] journals. If you know what their style is, you know whether you’ll fit in.”

Literary Citizenship Festival: Select Quotes from Becca J. R. Lachman

“For me there’s just something so distilled about a poem that can’t hide.”

Stafford Event, September 20, 2014, ARTS/Wset, Athens, OH

Becca J. R. Lachman (’04) is author of Other Acreage (forthcoming, Gold Wake, 2015); A Ritual to Read Together: Poems in Conversation with William Stafford (ed., Woodley Press, 2013); The Apple Speaks (Cascadia, 2012). She is recipient of a 2011 Otterbein Young Alumni Award. Lachman visited Otterbein and read her work on Friday, January 30 in the Philomathean Room.

“I like to base my writings in research or overheard stories, as many writers do.”

“I had stayed away from William Stafford because I thought he was just another dead white guy I was supposed to be reader, but then I started hearing about his life–he was a conscientious objector during World War II! So was my grandpa! Before I knew it, I fell in love.”

“For me there’s just something so distilled about a poem that can’t hide.”

“Working in writing centers has opened my eyes to my own privilege.”

“I have learned ways to mother in this world.”

“What is our idea of wealth? What is our idea of success? There’s a difference between wealth and being rich. How much money do you really need to make in life?”

Literary Citizenship Festival: Select Quotes from Jennifer Roberts

“Every decision I make is going to affect my creative life.”

roberts

Jennifer Roberts’ (’07) latest play, The Killing Jar, was a Dayton Playhouse FutureFest finalist in 2014. She is also the writer of Beekeeper (Virago Theatre Company, 2011), Factory Farm: A Documentary, which was staged for a Washington, D.C. Planned Parenthood benefit, and numerous short plays staged in the San Francisco Bay area. Roberts visited Otterbein and read her work on Saturday, January 31 in Riley Auditorium.

“Otterbein is where I learned to become…where I found my voice.”

“It’s important to hear women’s voices, to hear women’s stories–often, we’re silent. It’s important that writers show the world we’re living in, a world with strong women.”

“It was the ‘zine and working with Women’s Studies here that led to me working with women’s rights and reproductive rights.”

“Every decision I make is going to affect my creative life.”

“Build your community. You need support and you need to support other people. That is what will bring you success, however you define that.”

Literary Citizenship Festival: Select Quotes from Ladan Osman

“The relationship between light and dark is a philosophical question about truth.”

osman Ladan Osman (’06) is the author of The Kitchen Dweller’s Testimony, winner of the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets. Her chapbook, Ordinary Heaven, was published by Slapering Hol Press in 2014. Osman has also been awarded several prestigious fellowships in the arts. Osman visited Otterbein and read her work on Saturday, January 31 in Riley Auditorium.

“I find it particularly important to invoke my ancestors–particularly those who are young and gone.”

“I think that each poem has an atmosphere that demands something. I think that a lot about ferns and their relationship with light and darkness. It’s something I take time to meditate on. I myself am very comfortable around plants and seawater. In a way, I am even meditating within the writing.”

“I think the most important truth to consider is inherently inhumane positioning of marginalized people. It’s important for me to assert my authority and to detail the vulnerabilities of occupying that position.”

“I think we have to accommodate the story that demands to be written.”

“The relationship between light and darkness is a philosophical question about truth.”

“In graduate school, I learned not to look at someone’s professional success, but to ask, ‘Are we making a connection?'”

“Be tactical, and be honest with yourself about what you want.”

“It’s okay for it to be lonely. As you get older, it’s harder and harder to find people who care about the work outside of markers of success.”